Saturday, February 09, 2008

Public Performances at Third Place Books

I've been so busy. My apologies for not keeping up with your blogs. I plan to do a little catch-up over the weekend.

The good news is that I have some public performance gigs scheduled for the next months. A few days ago, I received an email from two different library colleagues that Third Place Books needed a storyteller for some Friday preschool storytimes. I emailed the contact person on Tuesday evening, and got a message Wednesday morning that she needed someone as soon as that Friday morning. I accepted, performed for about 20 children and grownups yesterday, and now have four three more storytimes planned: March 14, May 30, and June 27. Performing at bookstores is always perilous, of course, because I often end up spending at least the amount I make on books. Yesterday, I picked up a copy of Margaret Read MacDonald's The Great, Smelly, Slobbery, Small-Tooth Dog for Lucia for Valentine's Day (and she is "sweet as a honeycomb"), plus The McElderry Book of Greek Myths, by Eric Kimmel. I may have also picked up a used copy of a Tudor historical fiction book written by an author who takes great liberties with her subject matter, but that information is strictly entre-nous.

I've got a birthday party gig this morning, so I'm off and running soon. To be continued...

12:35 pm: What an engaging bunch of children! Most of them were in the 3 year old range, so I emphasized music over straight-up stories. Really, though, the interactive songs like "Jenny Jenkins" and "Fly Through My Window" have little stories of their own. I used the dyed play-silks my mom made for me and sang Nancy Stewart's "Dancing Rainbow Colors." The hosts had arranged the birthday girl's play canopy over the space where I performed and it looked like a fairy bower.

7 comments:

Anamaria (bookstogether) said...

Congratulations on the bookstore gigs! I hope they give you a discount on your books, too. Very curious to hear what you think about Kimmel's Greek Myths--my copy came on Tuesday. I should probably wait to say more until you have a chance to read yours, though.

Alkelda the Gleeful said...

Anamaria: They don't give me a discount on books, but they are independent, so that's okay. I'm going to need some time away from Lucia to sit down and read the Kimmel book in-depth, but so far, I like the illustrations and the narrative style, but am not thrilled with the liberties taken with the stories to fit modern sensibilities.

blogapotamus said...

Reading Phillipa Gregory is rather like consuming an over-large box of store-brand chocolates- you know it's not good for you, but you just can't help yourself. Looking forward to the forthcoming film. :)

Alkelda the Gleeful said...

Blogapotamus: That's a good way to put it. My analogy was that it was like consuming potato chips and rationalizing that you're getting your vegetable-nutrition (i.e. history) from the potatoes.

Anamaria (bookstogether) said...

At least Philippa Gregory paints a flattering portrait of Katherine of Aragon (who often comes across as the Hera to Henry's...Henry). Now if only Showtime's The Tudors were as compelling as HBO's Rome.

We'll be seeing the movie (TOBG), too!

Alkelda the Gleeful said...

Anamaria: Blogger ate my comment. Confound blogger. Anyway... I know Katherine of Aragon isn't nearly as exciting as Anne Boleyn, but I think I've always read her character as portrayed respectfully, at least. I'm a Katherine of Aragon fan, but I can't imagine history without QE I.

Lone Star Ma said...

Congrats!